17
Feb

My listening habits shift by the week. Usually, literally. I’ll spend an entire week listening only to Jamaican Dancehall, the next to bands with either Dave Grohl,  Josh Homme, or both of them, in . I let whimsy and external influence dictate it. This week it’s “space jazz” or “spiritual jazz”; a music, usually from the late 60s, characterised by abstract, filmic arrangements, unusual combinations of instruments and a cosmic, spiritual or political (or all three!) ethos. These bands drew on psychedelia, cathartic walls of noise, gentle waves of “ambience”, soul & early funk. A few bands got into synthesisers, but you’re just as likely to find a sitar or a koto (or both) next to a Fender Rhodes and the more traditional brass instruments found in jazz ensembles.

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13
Jan
I mention it both because I’m friends with most of the band and also because I’m intrigued that the home recording revolution has spread into the jazz world. There may be countless other CDs of this type, but I don’t know because I run in different circles. This effort shows how great a recording one can make with good musicians & songs, some relatively cheap equipment and a passion for the music.This is a post to recommend “Moon And Sand” album by the Remember April Quintet: A mixture of latin jazz standards (“One Note Samba”, “How Insensitive” & more) and one or two original pieces. The band perform & sing simply & beautifully together and the recording is a pleasure to listen to: calming, laid back, but deeply soulful in places.

This is a post to recommend “Moon And Sand” album by the Remember April Quintet: A mixture of latin jazz standards (”One Note Samba”, “How Insensitive” & more) and one or two original pieces. The band perform & sing simply & beautifully together and the recording is a pleasure to listen to: calming, laid back, but deeply soulful in places.

Read the rest of this entry »